Around Tomintoul

Famous for making great tasting whiskies
  • Around Tomintoul

    Tomintoul is within the whisky producing region of Speyside, famous for making great tasting whiskies. The area surrounding Tomintoul is of astounding natural beauty, with an array of flora and fauna specific to the region. Many of Scotland’s most endangered species are protected in the wilderness here.

    These include the golden eagle, mountain hare, wild cat, black grouse, crossbill, dotterel, ptarmigan, crested tit, pine marten, red squirrel, water vole and otter.

    Many pheasants live around the distillery and will come to visit us when the grain trucks arrive for a free dinner. One particular fellow, whom we’ve named Vincent, has become a bit of a distillery mascot, and can be fed by hand.

    Robert feeding pheasant

    Tomintoul is within the gateway to the Cairngorm National Park, in the 23,000 hectare (230 square kilometres) Glenlivet estate.

    The local village of Tomintoul was built in 1776 by the 4th Duke of Gordon and is the highest village in the Highlands of Scotland. As the area is so high, snow in the winter can often last quite late into the spring. However, it’s one of the driest areas in Scotland, as the Cairngorm Mountains intercept much of the rain.

    There are a number of quarries in the Glenlivet estate that are no longer in use. The area holds different types of rock, including quartz and red sandstone formed as far back as 740 million years ago.

    Local History

    The estate of Glenlivet has been part of The Crown Estate since the 1930s, owned by the Queen of the United Kingdom. Since 1760, surplus revenue, after management expenses, from The Estate, has been surrendered to The Exchequer each year. For 600 years, The Glenlivet Estate was owned the Dukes of Gordon and Richmond. It was the 4th Duke of Gordon who planned and built the local village of Tomintoul in the 1770s.

    The local minister of Tomintoul in 1797 wrote that “Tomintoul is inhabited by 37 families, without any industry. All of them sell whisky and all of them drink it. When disengaged from this business, the women spin yarn, kiss their inamoratos or dance to the discordant sounds of an old fiddle”.

    The Battle of Glenlivet was fought on 3 October 1594, as a religious conflict between Catholic and Protestants forces, in response to a 1593 decree, ordering all Catholics to give up their faith or leave the country. George Gordon, 1st Marquess of Huntly, and Francis Hay, 9th Earl of Erroll, led a Catholic force of 2000 local Highlanders from Clan Gordon, Clan Hay, Clan Comyn, Clan Cameron and Clan Cumming. They won victory over the 10,000 Protestant force led by Archibald Campbell, 7th Earl of Argyll, consisting of Highlanders from Clan Campbell, Clan Murray, Clan Stewart, Clan Forbes, Clan Macgillivray, Clan Maclean, Clan Grant, and the Chattan Confederation of Clan Mackintosh. Their victory was said to be down to their use of artillery and horse over irregular infantry.

    As the hills in this region of Scotland that surrounds Tomintoul are so secluded, they were the perfect place for illicit distilling. This was the small-scale illegal distillation and smuggling of whisky which was not declared to avoid tax. By 1820, as many as 14,000 illegal stills were confiscated each year. The Excise Act was introduced in 1823 so that whisky could be distilled under a licence, which allowed an acceptable profit to be made legally.

  • Contact Us

    If you'd like to get in touch with us, please contact:

    Robert Fleming, Master Distiller
    Tomintoul Distillery,
    Ballindalloch,
    Banffshire
    AB37 9AQ

    Telephone: +44 (0)1807 590 274
    Fax: +44 (0)1807 590 342

    Email: rfleming@tomintouldistillery.co.uk

    You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter, where we'd love to hear your feedback!

    If you are an importer, distributor, wholesaler or supermarket group looking to import Scotch Whisky or other spirits, please contact our head office at Angus Dundee Distillers Plc.

    Tomintoul Newsletter

    Alternatively, to keep up with the latest news and updates, please sign up to our newsletter

    Subscribe to our mailing list

    * indicates required
  • Enjoying Me

    We’ve lovingly made each of our Tomintoul whiskies so that they taste perfect just as they are. However, the Tomintoul range is very versatile and can be enjoyed in lots of ways. There are no rights or wrongs, as long as you are enjoying it.

    Please be sure that when you’re enjoying Tomintoul, you drink it responsibility. You can visit Drink Aware for facts about drinking alcohol.

    Naked

    Tomintoul Whisky tastes great on its own and can be left at room temperature. Take a sip and let it sit in your mouth. Be sure to have a good “nose” (sniff) of the glass and think about the aromas as well as the flavours in the whisky. There are no right or wrong answers when it comes to the notes you will find when doing a whisky tasting – that’s part of the fun!

    With Ice or Water

    Many people like to add either ice or water to their whisky. Adding water reduces the alcohol content and can release different aromas and flavours. Usually in a whisky tasting, a drop or two of water is always added. The whisky will be tasted both with and without water to see how the flavours and aroma differ. You can add as much water as you like, though we’d suggest you add it gradually so that you can get it just right for your taste.

  • Whiskies

    Tomintoul Distillery is tucked away in the Glenlivet estate in the Speyside region of Scotland, between the Cromdale Hills and the River Avon. Since production began in 1965, we have been sourcing the purest water from the Ballantruan Spring. The pure ingredients and natural environment add to the smooth and mellow character of our award-winning Tomintoul Speyside Glenlivet Single Malt Scotch Whisky, “the gentle dram”.  If you want to impress people with your grasp of the Scottish language, the proper way to pronounce Tomintoul is “Tom-in-TOWEL” In Scottish Gaelic this means “hill of the barn”.

  • The Dream Team

    Tomintoul whisky is a testament to our Master Distiller, Robert Fleming, whose family has been making whisky in the Speyside Glenlivet region for four generations. He began working in the whisky industry in 1974, and worked for a number of different distilleries until coming to Tomintoul, where he has been for over 20 years. Robert is responsible for all aspects of production and is very passionate about making exceptional Scotch Whisky.

    Robert Fleming  -  Distilleries Director small file

    Our team at Tomintoul is like one big friendly family. Some have been with us since the beginning. We all share one big passion – all things Tomintoul Whisky!

    Mr Clifford Springle Retirement 25 7 2013 3

     

  • Making Tomintoul

    From Earth to the Bottle

    Tomintoul is made with natural ingredients. The pure spring water we use is drawn from The Ballantruan Spring. The water is so pure it took a year of searching different sources to find it. We mix this water with fresh barley and yeast, throw in some passion, skill and care, and then add a good dose of time.

    FIELDS OF BARLEY PHOTO BY NIKKI BRAND 2012 4

    Pure Barley Magic

    The first stage in making Tomintoul Whisky begins with malting barley. It first needs to be soaked in water, where it begins to sprout. This process causes the grain to turn its store of starch into sugars, which will later feed the yeast to make alcohol. The barley is heated until dry to stop it germinating any further.

    Barley is sometimes dried with peat, a natural fuel source dug from the land that if left for many thousands of years would eventually become coal. Peat gives the barley a smoky flavour which carries through into the whisky. The more peat used, the smoker the whisky will be.

    Tomintoul whiskies are not made with barley that’s been dried with peat, so they aren’t smoky in flavour. The exception to this is our Tomintoul Peaty Tang, which we make small in batches twice a year using peated malt.

    We take malted barley and grind it down in a mill so that it becomes coarse flour called “grist”.

    The Mash Mix

    We take grist and mix it up with hot water in a large vessel called a “mash tun”. It becomes a porridge-like mixture that needs continuous stirring so that any soluble starch turns into sugars. A sweet, sugary liquid, called “wort”, is drained off in three batches.

     

    Bubbly Brew

    We ferment the sweet, barley liquid using a technique very similar to brewing beer. First we cool it down so we can add the yeast which turns the sugar in the liquid to alcohol. The yeast gives off heat and carbon dioxide, creating large foamy bubbles. We end up with an alcoholic liquid that’s about 8-9 %ABV that we call “wash”.

    The Spirit Bit

    The wash goes into copper pot stills, which are like large electric kettles. When carefully heated, the alcohol evaporates at a lower temperature than water. It rises up the still and we collect and condense it back into a liquid. We do this process twice, until we end up with “new make” spirit that is 69% ABV.

    Pure Selection

    Not all new spirit that comes off the spirit still is good enough to meet our high standards and be matured. To ensure we choose only the purest, best tasting middle bit, it runs off the still and into a “spirit safe”. It’s now under control by Her Majesty’s Customs & Excise so has to stay locked. The first and last portions or “cut” of the spirit is re-distilled while the pure middle bit goes straight into casks to mature.

    The Long Sleep

    Tomintoul lies in oak wood casks for many years before it goes into a bottle. It has time to soak in the flavour from the different layers of the wood. The wood is breathable, and 2% of the whisky evaporates from the cask each year. We call this “the angels share” (the sweet aroma of Tomintoul that fills the air around our warehouses is one of the best in the world). The pure, fresh air surrounding our distillery, the highest in Speyside, is unique, and this has a job to play in making the unique flavour of our whisky.

    We only take Tomintoul whisky out the cask when we think it tastes perfect. Flavour and characteristics change over time. It’s very much about personal taste - you may find you particularly like one of our young whiskies or you might fall in love with something older.

    Embracing the Earth

    When we make Tomintoul we use many processes to ensure that very little gets wasted. We recycle the cold water that used for cooling the hot  vapour that rises from the spirt to heat the wort. It’s also mixed with the left over barley husks left behind from the mash  to make a  syrup that’s used as cattle food. Anything left over after the second distillation makes great fertiliser for next year’s crop of barley. The environment that surrounds us can be tasted in every glass, which is why it’s as precious to us as every last drop of Tomintoul Single Malt Scotch Whisky.

    The Cask Effect

    All whisky casks are made from oak wood. It’s flexible, porous and breathable. The layers of wood give different flavours to the whisky over time. American oak wood gives notes of vanilla, while the difference in the grain of European oak wood gives notes of spice and fruit. Most casks used for maturing whisky are made from American oak wood and have previously matured bourbon. European oak casks are first used for maturing fortified wines like sherry and port. Brand new casks over-power the subtle flavours of Scotch Whisky, so it’s preferable to use “seasoned” casks that have held other types of alcohol.

    SPIRIT IN THE SKY BY NIKKI BRAND2

    Whisky hasn’t always been matured in casks, and the benefit of maturing it was actually discovered by accident. Legend has that back in the days of illicit distilling, when stills were hidden away all over Scotland, one insignificant cask left forgotten led to shape the rich flavoursome spirit that we know today. Now new make spirit has to be matured for at least 3 years to legally be classified as Scotch Whisky.

    Tomintoul Aged 10, 14, 16, 21, 33, 1976 Years and Tomintoul Vintage Single Cask are matured in ex-bourbon casks made from American white oak.

    Tomintoul Aged 12 Years Oloroso is firstly matured in ex-bourbon casks, then “finished” for up to three years European oak wood casks from Spain that have contained oloroso sherry.

    We use ex-portwood casks from Portugal, also made from European oak, to finish Tomintoul Aged 12 Years Portwood Finish for up to three years.

    The Best Bottle

    Each finished bottle of Tomintoul Whisky is made by marrying together an expertly selected range of different casks. This allows us to ensure each bottle has the correct characteristics, best quality and flavour expected of each expression.

    The exception to this is Tomintoul Vintage Cask, which is a single cask whisky, meaning it’s made from just one cask, selected by us for its wonderful flavour. Only a limited number of bottles of the Vintage Single Cask could be made, and the flavour can never be replicated again exactly.

    Most Tomintoul whiskies have an age statement on the label. The age represents the very youngest whisky that has been used, even if other whiskies in the bottle are older. This is a legal requirement.

    Older whiskies, matured for longer, often become more complex in flavour. Preference is largely determined by personal taste; you can find that you’ll fall in love with our whiskies at any age. All ages of Tomintoul Whisky are selected when our Master Distiller thinks they are just right, and each has a unique flavour profile.

  • About

    Tomintoul Distillery

    Tomintoul Distillery is tucked away in the Speyside region of Scotland, between the Cromdale Hills and the River Avon, within the Glenlivet estate. The natural environment, fresh air and pure water add to the uniquely smooth and mellow character of our award-winning Single Malt Whisky, known as “the gentle dram”.

    If you want to impress your friends, the proper way to pronounce Tomintoul is “Tom-in-TOWEL”. In Scottish Gaelic this means “hill of the barn”.

    Around Tomintoul

    Nature at its Best

    Tomintoul is within the whisky producing region of Speyside, famous for making great tasting whiskies.

    The area surrounding Tomintoul is of astounding natural beauty, with an array of flora and fauna specific to the region. Many of Scotland’s most endangered species are protected in the wilderness here. These include the golden eagle, mountain hare, wild cat, black grouse, crossbill, dotterel, ptarmigan, crested tit, pine marten, red squirrel, water vole and otter.

    Many pheasants live around the distillery and will come to visit us when the grain trucks arrive for a free dinner. One particular fellow, who we’ve named Vincent, has become a bit of a distillery mascot, and can be fed by hand.

    Robert feeding pheasant

    Tomintoul is within the gateway to the Cairngorm National Park, in the 23,000 hectare (230 square kilometres) Glenlivet estate.

    The local village of Tomintoul was built in 1776 by the 4th Duke of Gordon and is the highest village in the Highlands of Scotland. As the area is so high, snow in the winter can often last quite late into the spring. However, it’s one of the driest areas in Scotland, as the Cairngorm Mountains intercept much of the rain.

    There are a number of quarries in the Glenlivet estate that are no longer in use. The area holds different types of rock, including quartz and red sandstone formed as far back as 740 million years ago.

    Local History

    Robert Fleming portrait

    The estate of Glenlivet has been part of The Crown Estate since the 1930s, owned by the Queen of the United Kingdom. Since 1760, surplus revenue, after management expenses, from The Estate, has been surrendered to The Exchequer each year. For 600 years, The Glenlivet Estate was owned the Dukes of Gordon and Richmond. It was the 4th Duke of Gordon who planned and built the local village of Tomintoul in the 1770s.

    The local minister of Tomintoul in 1797 wrote that “Tomintoul is inhabited by 37 families, without any industry. All of them sell whisky and all of them drink it. When disengaged from this business, the women spin yarn, kiss their inamoratos or dance to the discordant sounds of an old fiddle”.

    The Battle of Glenlivet was fought on 3 October 1594, as a religious conflict between Catholic and Protestants forces, in response to a 1593 decree, ordering all Catholics to give up their faith or leave the country. George Gordon, 1st Marquess of Huntly, and Francis Hay, 9th Earl of Erroll, led a Catholic force of 2000 local Highlanders from Clan Gordon, Clan Hay, Clan Comyn, Clan Cameron and Clan Cumming. They won victory over the 10,000 Protestant force led by Archibald Campbell, 7th Earl of Argyll, consisting of Highlanders from Clan Campbell, Clan Murray, Clan Stewart, Clan Forbes, Clan Macgillivray, Clan Maclean, Clan Grant, and the Chattan Confederation of Clan Mackintosh. Their victory was said to be down to their use of artillery and horse over irregular infantry.

    As the hills in this region of Scotland that surrounds Tomintoul are so secluded, they were the perfect place for illicit distilling. This was the small-scale illegal distillation and smuggling of whisky which was not declared to avoid tax. By 1820, as many as 14,000 illegal stills were confiscated each year. The Excise Act was introduced in 1823 so that whisky could be distilled under a licence, which allowed an acceptable profit to be made legally.

    About Whisky

    Whisky Producing Regions (Map)

    Map

    Lowland

    If you were to draw an imaginary line from Greenock in the west to Dundee in the east, the Lowland region continues down from this line to the border with England. Whiskies from the Lowland region are known for being light and grassy. There are only a handful of distilleries that remain in the lowlands region today.

    Speyside

    Speyside is a small area of the Highlands famous for making good whisky, which is highly concentrated with distilleries - it is here that Tomintoul is located. The superb quality of pure spring water which falls through the hills, the crisp fresh air, and the unspoilt countryside define the region.

    Islay

    Islay is an island just off the west coast of Scotland. Surrounded by the sea, the distilleries on this island have traditionally relied on peat to malt their barley, and as a result their whiskies are very smoky and medicinal. They also gain salty, seaweedy characteristics from the damp sea air. We use peated barley to make Tomintoul Peaty Tang, which, with its deep smoky flavour, is pretty unusual for a Speyside malt whisky.

    Highlands

    The Highlands is the largest region of Scotland and whiskies from this region can vary in flavour, from light and flora to nutty and rich. Highland whiskies are usually known for being quite complex.

    Campbeltown

    Campbeltown used to have 21 distilleries but now just has three, which produce salty, smoky, dry whiskies.

    Islands

    Island distilleries are usually influenced by their coastal location, with hints of the sea, and light, peaty, smoky notes.

    Entry Header 1Entry Header 2Entry Header 3Entry Header 4
    Entry First Line 1 Entry First Line 2 Entry First Line 3 Entry First Line 4
    Entry Line 1 Entry Line 2 Entry Line 3 Entry Line 4
    Entry Last Line 1 Entry Last Line 2 Entry Last Line 3 Entry Last Line 4

  • Privacy Policy

    The following policy outlines how Angus Dundee Distillers Plc. (“We”), owners of the brand Tomintoul Single Malt Scotch Whisky (and derivatives of the brand name) may collect, use and share your personal information (information about an identifiable individual) across our website www.angusdundee.co.uk (“Our Website”). We take the protection of your personal information very seriously and endeavour to protect it. The following policy applies across the website unless specifically stated otherwise.

    For the purpose of the Data Protection Act 1998 (the "Act"), the data controller is Angus Dundee Distillers Plc. (registered company number 487356) of 20-21 Cato Street, London, W1H 5JQ

    How We May Collect Information

    Any information provided by you when using our website, such as when registering with our website, filling in forms, subscribing to newsletters, taking part in market research, such as, but not limited to, questionnaires, entering competitions and signing up for promotions, and posting content on the public area of our website.

    Procedures have been put in place by Angus Dundee Distillers Plc. to safeguard your personal information that we collect. Information provided to us is stored on our secure servers. We cannot be responsible for any information provided to us while it is in transit; we cannot guarantee its security until it has reached us, therefore transmissions are at your own risk.

    What Information We May Collect

    Personal information collected may include, but is not limited to, name, contact details, demographic information and personal preferences. We may also collect information about your use of our website, such as, but not limited to, traffic data, location data (IP address) and the pages you access.

    We may store a cookie file on your computer’s hard drive, which is used to gather information about your general internet usage and allow the website to recognise you when you visit again. This information is in the form of statistical data and will not identify you as an individual. You can opt-out of accepting the use of cookies by adjusting your internet browser settings. Doing so may cause some areas of our website to be inaccessible.

    Information you provide on public areas of our website, such as, but not limited to, comment boards and social networking modules, is accessible to others and therefore may be collected and used by others. Such information is provided by you at your own risk. We would therefore recommend that you do not post personal information in such areas.

    How We May Use Your Information

    Unless otherwise specified, we will only contact you personally, with information or details of products or services, if you have specifically requested or given your permission for us to do so.

    We will only share your personal information with third parties or external companies, such as suppliers and contractors who work with Angus Dundee Distillers Plc., if we have gained your consent to do so.

    In the event that ownership of Angus Dundee Distillers Plc. should pass to another third party, then we will count any gathered personal information about our customers and consumers, as outlined, as a transferable asset.

    We may use personal information gathered about you for marketing analysis to help us improve our products and services.

    It is our duty to disclose your information to third parties, law enforcement, governmental or regulatory agencies, when, included but not limited to, we are requested to do so, to comply with applicable law, to protect against fraud, negligence, theft, audit requirements or to protect the rights of Angus Dundee Distillers Plc.

    Your Rights

    As outlined in the Act, it is your right to access any personal information we have stored about you, though it is our right to charge an £10 administration fee to cover the cost of accessing this information.

    You may unsubscribe at any time from receiving communications and marketing materials from Angus Dundee Distillers Plc. by contacting us at info@angusdundee.co.uk

  • Terms & Conditions

    This Website is provided by Angus Dundee Distillers Plc (herein Angus Dundee), owners of the brand Tomintoul Single Malt Scotch Whisky (and derivatives of the brand name). Your use of this website is subject to the following terms and conditions. Angus Dundee may revise these terms from time to time by updating this posting, with the revised terms taking effect as of the date of its posting.

    PLEASE READ THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF USE CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS WEBSITE. By using this site, you signify your agreement to these terms of use. If you do not agree to these terms of use, you may not use the website.

    Use of Materials on this Website

    Angus Dundee maintains this website for your personal information and education. You are welcome to use this website for personal reasons, download or print pages again for personal use. Please do not remove any copyright messages from the pages. You should assume that everything you see or read on the website (such as images, photographs, illustrations, icons, texts, video clips, written and other materials) is copyrighted and protected under law.

    You may not use materials from the Angus Dundee site in any way for any public or commercial purpose without our prior consent. Furthermore, you may not use or display Angus Dundee’s Material on any other website or in a networked computer environment for any purpose without our prior consent.

    If you violate any of these terms, we will revoke permission to use the website, and will request that you destroy all downloaded materials. Any unauthorised use of Angus Dundee’s Material by you may violate copyright or privacy laws.

    You may establish a link to the website from a third party site if:

    • The link does not imply any association, endorsement or sponsorship by Angus Dundee of your site or any products or services offered on your site
    • Linked pages from the website are displayed without alteration of any kind; specifically, you may not cause a user's web browser to display a "framed" version of the website in response to activating a link.

    Your Submissions

    Unless otherwise stated, any communication, comments or materials you transmit to the Angus Dundee website, such as questions or answers, comments or suggestions, will be treated as non-confidential by Angus Dundee. By posting communications to the website, you automatically grant Angus Dundee the right to use the materials, as part of any other works or materials Angus Dundee may produce in future.

    Disclaimer

    The information on this site is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended to serve as financial or other advice, nor as the basis of a contract. Your use of the website is at your risk. Angus Dundee does not warrant or represent that Angus Dundee material is accurate, error-free, truthful or reliable or that your use of Angus Dundee material will not infringe rights of third parties.

    Angus Dundee does not warrant that the functional aspects of the website will be error free or that this website or the server that makes it available are free of viruses or other harmful components. If your use of this website or Angus Dundee material results in the need for servicing or replacing property, material, equipment or data, Angus Dundee is not responsible for those costs. Without limiting the foregoing, everything on the website is provided to you "AS IS" AND "AS AVAILABLE" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, SATISFACTORY QUALITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, REASONABLE CARE AND SKILL, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT.

    Angus Dundee and its suppliers make no warranties about the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the Angus Dundee material, software text, graphics, and links, or about results to be obtained from using the website. Please note that some jurisdictions may not allow the exclusion of implied warranties, so some of the above exclusions may not apply to you.

    Trademark Notice

    The trademarks, logos and service marks which you see on this site are registered and unregistered trademarks of Angus Dundee or its affiliates or are licensed to Angus Dundee by third parties. Nothing contained on the website should be construed as granting, by implication, estoppel, or otherwise, any licence or right to use any trademark, logo or service mark displayed on this website without the written permission of Angus Dundee or such third party who owns the trademark. Your misuse of any trademark displayed on the website, or any other content on the website, except as provided herein, is strictly prohibited.

    Termination

    You agree that Angus Dundee may terminate your use of the website if Angus Dundee reasonably believes that you have violated or acted inconsistently with the letter or spirit of this Agreement, or violated the rights of Angus Dundee or any third party, or for any reason with or without notice to you. You agree that Angus Dundee may modify or discontinue this website, with or without notice to you. You agree that Angus Dundee will not be liable to you or any third party as a result of such modification or discontinuation. The provisions remain in force despite termination of this Agreement.

    Limitation of Liability

    Under no circumstances whatsoever shall Angus Dundee be liable for any loss arising out of or in connection with the use of information available from this website whether direct or indirect including, without limitation, any liability relating to any loss of use, interruption of business, lost profits or lost data, or incidental, special or consequential damages of any kind regardless of the form of action, whether in contract, tort (including negligence) or otherwise, even if Angus Dundee has been advised of the possibility of such damages. Because some states and countries do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages, the above limitation may not apply to you.

    Severability

    If any portion of these terms is held to be unenforceable, the unenforceable portion shall be construed in accordance with English law to the greatest extent possible. If any of the terms of this Agreement become or are declared to be illegal or otherwise unenforceable by any Court of competent jurisdiction, such term(s) shall be null and void and shall be deemed deleted from this Agreement. All remaining terms of this Agreement shall remain in full force and effect.

    General Provisions

    Unless otherwise specified, the information and materials in the site are presented solely for the purpose of providing information about services and products of Angus Dundee. Angus Dundee makes no representation that Angus Dundee material is appropriate or available for use in every country of the world. You use this website at your own risk and are responsible for compliance with applicable local laws, keeping in mind that access to Angus Dundee’s material may not be legal by certain persons or in certain countries. This website may describe products or services that are not available worldwide. Any cause of action you may have with respect to this website must be commenced within two years after the claim or cause of action arises or such claim or cause of action is barred. These terms will be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of England and Wales without regard to its conflicts of law provisions. The waiver by Angus Dundee of a breach of any provision of this Agreement will not operate to be interpreted as a waiver of any other or subsequent breach.

  • Our Distillery

    Tomintoul Distillery is located inside the picturesque Glenlivet estate, within the whisky producing region of Speyside. The distillery is named after the nearby village of Tomintoul, the highest village in the Highlands of Scotland.

    Our Distillery Manager, Robert Fleming is a fourth generation distiller, born and bred on the Glenlivet estate.

    distillery image

    It took us a year of searching for the purest source of spring water until we found the Ballantruan spring. This determined the location of the distillery, tucked away in picturesque countryside. The natural and unspoilt environment that surrounds us, and our focus on making great whisky, can be tasted in every glass of “the gentle dram”.

    Roots

    Tomintoul Distillery was built in 1964. Our distillery uses traditional techniques that stretch back hundreds of years, to make our award-winning single malt, “the gentle dram”. The natural environment, fresh air and pure water all add to our uniquely smooth and mellow spirit.

    robertf

    The Dream Team

    Tomintoul Whisky is a testament to our Master Distiller, Robert Fleming, whose family has been making whisky in the Speyside Glenlivet region for four generations. He began working in the whisky industry in 1974, and worked for a number of different distilleries until coming to Tomintoul, where he has been for over 20 years. Robert is responsible for all aspects of production and is very passionate about making exceptional Scotch Whisky. 

     

    Our team at Tomintoul is like one big friendly family. Some have been with us since the beginning. We all share one big passion – all things Tomintoul Whisky!

    Making Tomintoul

    From Earth to the Bottle

    Tomintoul is made with natural ingredients. The pure spring water we use is drawn from The Ballantruan Spring. The water is so pure it took a year of searching different sources to find it. We mix this water with fresh barley and yeast, throw in some passion, skill and care, and then add a good dose of time.

    Pure Barley Magic

    The first stage in making Tomintoul Whisky begins with malting barley. It first needs to be soaked in water, where it begins to sprout. This process causes the grain to turn its store of starch into sugars, which will later feed the yeast to make alcohol. The barley is heated until dry to stop it germinating any further.

    Barley is sometimes dried with peat, a natural fuel source dug from the land that if left for many thousands of years would eventually become coal. Peat gives the barley a smoky flavour which carries through into the whisky. The more peat used, the smokier the whisky will be.

    Tomintoul whiskies are not made with barley that’s been dried with peat, so they aren’t smoky in flavour. The exception to this is our Tomintoul Peaty Tang, which we make in small batches twice a year using peated malt.

    We take malted barley and grind it down in a mill so that it becomes coarse flour called “grist”.

    The Mash Mix

    We take grist and mix it up with hot water in a large vessel called a “mash tun”. It becomes a porridge-like mixture that needs continuous stirring so that any soluble starch turns into sugars. A sweet, sugary liquid, called “wort”, is drained off in three batches.

    Bubbly Brew

    We ferment the sweet, barley liquid using a technique very similar to brewing beer. First we cool it down so we can add the yeast which turns the sugar in the liquid to alcohol. The yeast gives off heat and carbon dioxide, creating large foamy bubbles. We end up with an alcoholic liquid that’s about 8-9 %ABV that we call “wash”.

    The Spirit Bit

    The wash goes into copper pot stills, which are like large electric kettles. When carefully heated, the alcohol evaporates at a lower temperature than water. It rises up the still and we collect and condense it back into a liquid. We do this process twice, until we end up with “new make” spirit that is 69% ABV.

    Pure Selection

    Not all new spirit that comes off the spirit still is good enough to meet our high standards and be matured. We choose only the purest middle part of the "run" to be collected in the "spirit safe". It is now under the control of Her Majesty's Customs & Excise and so has to stay locked. The first and last portions or “cut” of the spirit is re-distilled while the pure middle bit goes straight into casks to mature.

    The Long Sleep

    Tomintoul lies in oak wood casks for many years before it goes into a bottle. It has time to soak in the flavour from the different layers of the wood. The wood is breathable, and 2% of the whisky evaporates from the cask each year. We call this “the angels' share” (the sweet aroma of Tomintoul that fills the air around our warehouses is one of the best in the world). The pure, fresh air surrounding our distillery, the highest in Speyside, is unique, and this has a job to play in making the unique flavour of our whisky.

    We only take Tomintoul whisky out the cask when we think it tastes perfect. Flavour and characteristics change over time. It’s very much about personal taste - you may find you particularly like one of our young whiskies or you might fall in love with something older.

    Embracing the Earth

    When we make Tomintoul we use many processes to ensure that very little gets wasted. We recycle the cold water that is used for cooling the hot vapour that rises from the spirt to heat the wort. It’s also mixed with the left over barley husks left behind from the mash to make syrup that’s used as cattle food. Anything left over after the second distillation makes great fertiliser for next year’s crop of barley. The environment that surrounds us can be tasted in every glass, which is why it’s as precious to us as every last drop of Tomintoul Single Malt Scotch Whisky.

    The Cask Effect

    All whisky casks are made from oak wood. It’s flexible, porous and breathable. The layers of wood give different flavours to the whisky over time. American oak wood gives notes of vanilla, while the difference in the grain of European oak wood gives notes of spice and fruit. Most casks used for maturing whisky are made from American oak wood and have previously matured bourbon. European oak casks are first used for maturing fortified wines like sherry and port. Brand new casks over-power the subtle flavours of Scotch Whisky, so it’s preferable to use “seasoned” casks that have held other types of alcohol.

    Whisky hasn’t always been matured in casks, and the benefit of maturing it was actually discovered by accident. Legend has it that back in the days of illicit distilling, when stills were hidden away all over Scotland, one insignificant cask left forgotten led to shape the rich flavoursome spirit that we know today. Now new make spirit has to be matured for at least 3 years to legally be classified as Scotch Whisky.

    Tomintoul Aged 10, 14, 16, 21, 33, 1976 Years and Tomintoul Vintage Single Cask are matured in ex-bourbon casks made from American white oak.

    Tomintoul Aged 12 Years Oloroso is firstly matured in ex-bourbon casks, then “finished” for up to three years in European oak wood casks from Spain that have previously contained sherry.

    We use ex-portwood casks from Portugal, also made from European oak, to finish Tomintoul Aged 12 Years Portwood Finish for up to three years.

    The Best Bottle

    Each finished bottle of Tomintoul Whisky is made by marrying together an expertly selected range of different casks. This allows us to ensure each bottle has the correct characteristics, best quality and flavour expected of each expression.

    The exception to this is Tomintoul Vintage Cask, which is a single cask whisky, meaning it’s made from just one cask, selected by us for its wonderful flavour. Only a limited number of bottles of the Vintage Single Cask could be made, and the flavour can never be replicated again exactly.

    Most Tomintoul whiskies have an age statement on the label. The age represents the very youngest whisky that has been used, even if other whiskies in the bottle are older. This is a legal requirement.

    Older whiskies, matured for longer, often become more complex in flavour. Preference is largely determined by personal taste; you can find that you’ll fall in love with our whiskies at any age. All ages of Tomintoul Whisky are selected when our Master Distiller thinks they are just right, and each has a unique flavour profile.

  • Tomintoul

    Home test

  • Subcategories

    We want to hear from you about what you think of our whisky, any ideas or feedback you may have or even just to keep in touch (we love making new friends of Tomintoul). We also want to keep you up to date with all the latest goings-on at the distillery, new products and competitions.

    There are several ways for you get involved with us: our blog features all the latest distillery news, ideas, and competitions and events. We also have a Facebook and Twitter page for Tomintoul.

    Keeping you updated on the latest events with Tomintoul whisky.

     

Are you of legal drinking age?

Yes No